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Thursday, July 31, 2014

1944: HERE COMES TELEVISION!


I remember it well; that a network connection of TV stations from Schenectady, to Philadelphia, to Washington D.C. It was the true beginning of  television coverage along the northeast coast. Channel 3, WPTZ, Channel 6, WFIL the Philadelphia Inquirer station, and channel 10, WCAU. Aluminum and primitive aerials began to appear on rooftops all over the area. It would be 3 or 4 years before the Glover family journeyed over to Bond's Electric on Hamilton Avenue and purchased a 10 inch Admiral "Consolette," thanks to my brother Bud's Navy mustering out pay. What a thrill it was! Every afternoon WPTZ ran old "B" westerns on their 1 hour "Frontier Playhouse" program. Saturday nights were set aside for Sid Caeser and Imogene Coca and "Your Show of Shows." Sunday afternoons in the Glover house included a then popular program called "Super Circus." In those very early years of commercial television, programming began around mid day and went off the air before midnight. The non broadcast hours were filled with what we all found was called a "test pattern" which television technicians used to adjust focus, clarity and the complete definition of the many horizontal and vertical lines that were part of the design.

Friday, July 25, 2014

1884: THE MASONIC TEMPLE: AN ARCHITECTURAL MASTERPIECE

 
It must have been the age. There is no way I can understand why that majestic structure that once stood on the Northwest Corner of North Warren and West State Street ever became a victim of the dreaded demolition of one of Trenton's true historic architectural treasures. These two articles, gleaned from my "MASONS-MASONIC" folder tell of the beginning of that beautiful building.  As I recall, Mr. Rider's school took up the 3rd floor of that building. 
Thanks to my regular visitor Joe Battiste for correcting my. I located the building on the corner of No. Warren and E. State instead of W. State. Street.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Fellow Hamilton Hornets will spend a very pleasant Saturday afternoon at the beautiful Stone Terrace on Kuser Road. (The site of the former Italian-American Sportsmen Club.) The 1950's was a special time to be a high school student. Drugs were relatively unheard of except for prescriptions and in some drug stores, a soda fountain. Our legendary Saturday night canteens had no fights, no police, and no smoking those funny cigarettes. Indeed, a kinder and relatively innocent generation led by a caring faculty.  
Mark your calendars members of HHS class of '54!
Mark your calendars members of HHS class of '54!

2014: AUGUST 26 LAKESIDE REUNION!

Ms. Nancy Johnes Fell and Ms. Eleanor Goldy Guear, presenters of this historic community reunion event even had the presence of mind to consider we seniors who do not like to drive at night! As you can see by the press release in the graphic, the folks who are or were Lakeside Park residents and friends, will be flocking to the huge room on the lower level of the Hamilton Township Public Library to meet, greet, and remember their life experiences in this lovely suburban community that was established way back in the early part of the 20th century. I have posted an article from 1944 with the names of many of the more prominent citizens and pioneer families of Lakeside Park. It will be very interesting to see how many on that lengthy list will be there or have relatives of those listed. I hope to see you there! 

MARK YOUR CALENDAR NOW AND NOTE THAT
RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED! 

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

1903: TRENTON WARD AND PRECINCT BOUNDARIES

Future generations just might find this article of interest. I know I did. As you can see the 14 city of Trenton Wards' boundaries are defined, along with the associated precinct numbers. An article well worth preserving.

Sunday, July 20, 2014

1897: TRENTON NEARLY BECAME THE CAPITOL OF THE U.S.

It was a very early battle of the north versus the south. Many northerners wanted Trenton on the Delaware to be the nation's capitol city. The southerners wanted the location to be on the Potomac on the Delaware. As you can see in the article above, the site on the Potomac was chosen in December, 1801. One can only imagine what Trenton would have become had it indeed become the political center of not only the U.S. but the entire world!

Saturday, July 19, 2014

VINTAGE ADS FOR VINTAGE VISITORS

My Mom used "Chipso;" also "Duz" (Duz does everything), "LUX,"  "RINSO" and before we got an electric washer, "OCTAGON" brown soap and that old reliable corrugated wash board to get out those really deep dirt stains on our clothes. There are many memories in that graphic from my "NOSTALGIA" folder; from "Cuticura" soap to Knickers to battery operated auto fans with the rubber fan blades that was aimed at the windshield of our 1930's automobiles.

1989: MEMORIES OF AN 80 YEAR OLD "COUNTRY BOY"

Do you remember how much fun it was to plunk down a penny and punch out a disk on one of those long forgotten "punch boards?" Indeed, do you remember punch boards? Do you remember going to your local "corner store" and standing at the penny candy counter and pondering just what tasty delights you would find in that little brown paper bag that held the aforementioned penny candy? If you were a country kid as I was, do you remember getting your foot impaled on one or two of those prickly cream colored "stickers" that grew wild along the pathway to your store? (we didn't have sidewalks in our neighborhood.) Read my old THE WAY WE WERE column and return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear....from out of the past come the thundering hoof beats of the great horse, "Silver;" the Lone Ranger rides again!"

Friday, July 18, 2014

1944: PREPARED HAM OR PORK ROLL

They were very sure we of the older generation were wrong when we sat down to a breakfast or dinner of prepared ham and eggs. In the early years, that famous Trenton delicacy was indeed known as "prepared ham," "prepared pork," and the MORE RECENT designation, "PORK ROLL" from Cloverdell, Taylor and of course, Case. Here's an ad in the Trenton Times, 1944: "PREPARED PORK" known for years as "PREPARED HAM."

1944: FROM MY "NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT" FOLDER

How great it is to be able to meld yesterday events and directly connect them to current situations and locations! Here's a 1944 real estate ad from Brundbook Builders offering 8 modern brick homes. I am speculation has it that the Google view above from the 200 block of today's Oliver Avenue in Ewing are the very same homes offered in the ad 60 years ago and quietly reside in my "EWING" and "NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT" folders.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

1944: THE FINKLE BOYS "BACKING THE ATTACK" IN WWII

When I started this website back in 2005, I coined the slogan, "Local History With A Personal Touch."
As I page through the millions of pages in my personal collection of Trenton newspapers from the past 145 years, I often find notable and historic articles, ads and photos relating to folks with whom I am familiar. Such is the case here when I hand-scanned this article on the Finkle brothers of Jackson Street. These Finkle boys may or may not be related to my friend and fellow historian Art Finkle whose Trenton Jewish Historical Society website provides a fascinating view of Jewish life in Trenton.
(http://trentonjewishhistoricalsociety.blogspot.com). Recalling how my mom worried with two of her sons involved in WWII, I imagine Mr. and Mrs. Finkle had a triple WWII worry with two sons serving honorably in the military during the war.

1944: LET'S NOT FORGET THE WOMEN OF WWII

So much attention is given to the male heroes of World War II that we sometimes overlook the incredibly historic and courageous service provided by the women of the "Greatest Generation." The WACS, WAVES, SPARS along with the military combat nurses and even "Rosy the Riveter" gals who replace many of the male factory work during World War II. It took me a bit of tweaking and repairing the graphic above to remove scratches and other imperfections, but it is well worthwhile to remember these female heroes of WWII.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

1944: ADOLPH HITLER GIVES HERMAN GOERING DICTATORIAL POWERS

July, 1944: The writing was on the wall. As the allied military of American, French, and British troops moved ever closer to Berlin from the west, the Russians were moving toward Berlin from the east. This graphic was re-formatted to fit the computer screen.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

2014: FOR "THE GREATEST GENERATION"

Actually, "FOR THE GREATEST GENERATION" as the title of this post would also apply to those of us who are now in our 70's and 80's, but most of the golden memories listed above came from my childhood as an  80 going on 81 senior citizen in this year of 2014. So, to you younger folks who were not around as you read these vestiges of a time which I describe as a "simpler and more less complicated time in America, come back with me to that aforementioned "simple and less complicated era.!"

Thursday, July 10, 2014

1991: HAMILTON GROWING OUT OF ITS RURAL CHARACTER

This very interesting article published 23 years ago shed interesting light on the town that has grown by epic proportions since nearly a quarter of a century ago. Imagine if today's Hamilton were indeed annexed to the city of Trenton. It was a very scary scenario considering the fact that in the ensuing years, Hamilton has grown and prospered and Trenton has fallen on very hard times.

1991: TOM GLOVER REMEMBERS HARVEY HESSER

Harvey Hesser was the epitome of the man who walked softly but carried a big stick. Soft spoken, dignified, intelligent, strict, and compassionate, are all adjectives that describes this Principal of Hamilton High School (West) during my years as a student there. It was my privilege to meet with him numerous times after I left Hamilton High school. He and his lovely wife Dorothy were frequent visitors to Louise Baird's apartment on Hamilton Avenue where Judy and I spent many years after we graduated.

1951: REMEMBERING "IF" FOR BOYS

Each of us has our favorite teacher or teachers from our grammar and high school years. For my dear wife of 60 years, Judy and I, it is most certainly Louise Simpson Baird who was the vocal music teacher at Hamilton High during our years there, and for MANY who were privileged to have been in her music room in the "tower" at Hamilton High, room 300. "Ouise" as she was known to all of us who loved her, was not only a Julliard educated music teacher who taught us how to sing in eight part harmony, she also introduced us to the beauty of Beethoven, Bach, Brahms, the militancy of Wagner, and the delightful music of Gilbert & Sullivan, Rudolph Friml, Rogers and Hart, Rogers and Hammerstein and so many others. She also taught both boys and girls about the meaning of life, exposing us to Kahlil Gibran,
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Saints. Augustine, Francis and others who opened the doors to the keys of the Kingdom. I created the graphic above as I recalled that we boys were exposed to Rudyard Kipling's "IF" for boys by this remarkable teacher.Louise Baird also planted in my psyche a quotation that I carry with me to this day. It is especially relevant to any man (or woman):

"The true test of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out."
TRULY WORDS TO LIVE BY!

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

2014: PARKSID AND OLDEN AVENUE IN EWING

This is for you, Sally Logan Gilman. The intersection you and I remember is nowhere near what you see in the Google photo above. John's old diner has been replaced by the large diner  you see in the background of the intersection. I think it is called the 3 Peters Diner.

Monday, July 07, 2014

1936: E. STATT.E ST. APPROACHING BROAD ST.

Here's another nice enhanced view of downtown Trenton, 1936.Note the cars parked on the street! A real "no no" when I was a young driver back in the 1950's. This photo an exquisite detailed view of the center of the city as it looked 77 years ago.

Sunday, July 06, 2014

1936: NO. BROAD APPROACHING STATE STREET

What a splendid view! I did a bit of re-formatting this photo to highlight the more interesting Trenton environment as it looked in 1936. I love that old Yard's "Panel truck" as we used to call those enclosed vehicles which are now deep into the antiquarian category of automobilia.

Friday, July 04, 2014

1925: RIDER COLLEGE E. STATE STREET TRENTON

I did a bit of enhancing on this Maxwell photo in order to bring a closer view to the old Rider College which has since moved into the major leagues and become today's beautiful Rider University in Lawrence. My grand daughter Jessica Saiia is currently attending that stalwart old -faculty and I understand she is on the Dean's List.

"TYPEWRITING - MATHMANTICS - SHORTHAND - BANKING"
From austere beginnings as the Rider-Moore business school along with another "Stewart" connection,
the early years of the school were to train students for business experience.  

2014: HAPPY AND SAFE 4TH TO ALL OUR VISITORS?

From my "HOLIDAYS" folder in the Hamilton Township Public Library Local History Collection, this splendid 1869 engraving of the celebration of the 4th of July in the country. From one of my "HARPER'S WEEKLY" magazines. Here's wishing everyone a happy and safe 4th!

Thursday, July 03, 2014

1909: BROAD STREET PARK DIARY


As the article above which I wrote a number of years ago indicates, Lawson Tattler was a figment of my imagination, as was Eli Mount. I took my father's "veddy, veddy" English middle name "Eli," and combined it with my mom's maiden name which was Mount. ( My mom's Mount roots go back to John Adams, the Borden family, Lord Cornwallis, and COUNTLESS others who are connected genealogically 7, 8 and sometimes 9 times removed.) The Tattler surname came from the Trenton connection with the pottery industry, and Lawson was the name of one of my Kuser School-Hamilton High friends and classmate. Assuming this little 800,000 visits venture survives into the future, generations to come will be very grateful that those of us who believe in preserving our historic heritage took the time and sometimes arduous research to come up with a valuable historical database.

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

1992: TRENTON'S "NEGRO" SCHOOL

 
I did this column back in 1992 during Black History Month. The African-American history in the city of Trenton and throughout Mercer County is a very interesting study. At the current time the Hamilton Township Public Library Local History Collection has

Monday, June 30, 2014



 Mark your calendar for Tuesday, August 26th from 1-4 PM at the Hamilton Township Public Library. Ms. Eleanor Goldy Guear and Ms. Nancy Johnes Fell are two historians whose families were pioneer settlers in Lakeside Park. These two talented ladies will be presenting an incredibly interesting program inviting residents of Lakeside Park along with those of us who have an abiding interest in this incredible neighborhood which is nestled along Gropp's Lake, or as we called it, "Lakeside." My last "Sentimental Journey" column in the Times recalled our Hamilton High choir beach party as we said our sad goodbyes and headed out on our respective careers. I am still getting comments on that column, most of them fondly recalling the wonderful years they (and I) spent on the sandy beach of spring fed Lakeside.


2014: Lucia Spera DiPolvere and husband Ed Mercer County Park

Still cutting the rug at 80! What a very refreshing and inspirational photo as Ed and Lucy perform their impressive dancing skills at still another local community venue; this one at the West Windsor Freedom Festival in Mercer County Park. Ed and Lucy are an inspiration to me, and I am sure to many of us who are in our in our eighth decade.

1889-1910: WEST STATE ST., TRENTON

Many thanks to Mr.Tom Tighue, for this photo from the TRENTONIANA collection at the Trenton Free Public Library.
Tom's Facebook comments:
  • Most of the home on the right in this picture were demolished to make room for a park. The State House is to the right of the homes in this picture.
  • Thomas Tighue "Progress through demolition"!

Saturday, June 28, 2014

2014: TOM'S SUMMER VOLUNTEER SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES

Did you ever sing around the piano at home when you were young? Did you ever sing around a camp fire on a lovely summer evening when it felt good to be alive? I can't furnish the piano, nor the camp fire, but I can take you back to those years when you sang along with the songs that were made to sing along. I hope to see some of my computer using friends tomorrow afternoon at the Hamilton Library. It is important to note that the library will be closed and there will be NO RESTROOM facilities available, so
go before you go!

Friday, June 27, 2014

1936: THE DAYTON HOUSE, 1237 SOUTH BROAD STREET

This was part of an overall view of South Broad Street approaching Liberty Street. I searched in vain for additional advertisements relating to the Dayton House, but there were not dating back to the 1930's that I could find. However, as seen in the photo, it was alive and well in 1936.

Thursday, June 26, 2014

1936: SOUTH BROAD APPROACHING LIBERTY STREET

The original R.C. Maxwell photo from which this graphic has been extracted and enhanced, gives a splendid, detailed view of the part of town so familiar to all. The locally famous "widow's watch" can be seen in the far right. One can almost feel like they are back in 1936 with those great old cars and the South Broad Street as it was 77 years ago.

1936: 2090 GREENWOOD AVENUE THEN AND NOW


I was 3 years old when this airplane photo of the Bromley section of Hamilton was taken with the Municipal Building as the point of interest. Notice the greenhouses and also the open fields around the building and Hollywood Drive in the upper left.Below is a 2014 Google Earth view of the 
same area as it is today.

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

BROMLEY 27 YEARS AGO. HOW THE TIME HAS FLOWN!

I remember the day I walked the neighborhood looking for vestiges of the Bromley of yesteryear and here we are 27 years later, and these photos taken with one of those antique 35 mm cameras once again come alive with photos of vintage Bromley structures. Few people realize this historic area of Hamilton which dates back to the colonial era when the Anderson Farm, which was once located on the city line in the area of today's North Logan Avenue, extended all the way out to the Greenwood Cemetery area. During the first decade of the 20th century, the area began to develop with the neighborhoods of Bromley Place and Bromley Manor bringing many residents to what was then rural Bromley. Further down Nottingham Way the historic Bromley Inn is slowly deteriorating and with the financial crunch we have in this year of 2014, chances are nearly nil that anyone with financial means will come along and restore that local treasure that dates back to Charles Fulkert's Bromley Inn, 1897.

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

1923: A CLOSEUP VIEW OF STATE AT BROAD STREET

This is a closeup view of the city of Trenton that was taken long before most of today's generation were alive. I was particularly intrigued with Mr. Sultanof's pickup truck and the view into the interior of that old car behind it. The clarity on the R.C. Maxwell photos, like most of them is superb.

Saturday, June 21, 2014

2014: TOM KICKS OFF THE SUMMER 2014 SUNDAY CONCERTS

 Tomorrow afternoon I will set up my computer and speakers and start the summer Sunday music presentations, "THE MUSIC WE GREW UP WITH;" also known as "WHEN MUSIC WAS MUSIC."
We'll be listening and singing along to the great songs of the 40's, 50's, 60's and even some listenable and singable songs from the 70's. The schedule this year is for the kickoff songfest to be on the lawn at the Hamilton Library tomorrow and again next Sunday from 3 to 5 P.M., after which the program will move to gazebo at Kuser Park for the months of July and August with programs being presented from 6 to 8 P.M.. Bring a folding chair or blanket and come spend a pleasant 2 hour interlude of 
music that I hope will never die!

Thursday, June 19, 2014

1989: TWENTY FIVE YEARS AGO IN HAMILTON

Here's an interesting look back to the Hamilton of 1989. Twenty five years ago! Seems like only yesterday.

1923: THE DONNELLY COMFORT STATION

Back in 2011 when I posted the graphic on the left, I began to realize that a number of my Hamilton Township Public Library Local History Collection output that I post on the web are often posted without crediting the library for finding the graphics. As my www.glover320.blogspot.com web blog grew to nearly 800,000 hits, I began to use "watermarks" with identifying legends on them, usually hidden in obscure places on the photo. I have a number of these watermarks and one can be seen in the lower right of each photo. Others are hidden in a light gray area where I type "LHC" as in Local History Collection, or "TGLHC" as in "tgloverlocal history collection."
One might ask why this is important: It should be obvious to most that there is quite a bit of intricate PhotoShop procedures that are quite time consuming in order to bring a graphic to its best enhanced condition. The photo on the left in the graphic is a good example of a "before" PhotoShop tweak, and that on the right is the result of some time consuming graphic tricks. Back in 2005 when this blog was created, it never entered my mind that these graphics would be picked up by another and posted without crediting the source.

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

1930: LONG BEFORE RE-CYCLING!

I remember when the "garbage man" made his curb pickup followed by the "ash man." Back in the day, most homes were heated by a coal and wood burning furnace. Ours was a HUGE circular affair with oven like cast iron doors which opened to reveal the fuel oven. Ours was mainly coal, but in the deep dark days of the depression, it was over to Kuser's Woods for a few wild cherry or oak mini logs to heat the house. We had a steel grate planted firmly between the dining room and what we called our "parlor" but today they call a living room. By the way, when you are passing down Sylvan Avenue and heading toward the Hamilton Township Public Works complex, you will see a huge hill on your left as you pass by the cross streets in the Patterson Avenue area. That was the location of the Hamilton Township incinerator with its huge tall chimney that belched out all kinds of bad stuff. Inside the incinerator building was a huge garage large enough to allow the garbage man's dump truck to back in and dump his load of garbage. A chain pulled block and tackle device hooked on to a very large manhole and lifted the cast iron cover from the burning ovens below the garage. At that point, all the garbage was dumped into the flaming inferno and consumed. Don Slabicki and I often drove there when we worked for the Kusers and took their trash to the incinerator. An indelible memory for me was the day that Don's dog "Rex" died. He brought Rex to the incinerator and he was cremated in the Hamilton incinerator. How in the world do I remember all thes 70 and more year old memories?

1979: HAMILTON TOWNSHIP'S MASTER PLAN



Thirty five years ago! How the time has flown. I recall how excited we all were when Hamilton unveiled what could really be called a "wish list" for the future, and in this case many of those wished came true. We have come a long way since my 80 years as a Hamilton resident. From the Glover small neighborhood garden with chickens and geese and flower and vegetable gardens, from huge sprawling farms surrounded by the villages of Mercerville, Hamilton Square, White Horse, Yardville, Groveville, Deutzville, and Bromley, there have been incredible changes as Hamilton turned from a rural farming community to the megalopolis it is and is evolving every year. How I wish I could be here in another 50 years, but alas, life is too short.

Monday, June 16, 2014

1946: BELLEVUE AVENUE BUS AT STATE & BROAD

I may have posted this earlier, but this time I zeroed in on Woolworth's, Grant's and Kresge's "five and dime stores."that were once a very familiar part of the downtown Trenton scene. Lunch at Woolworth's was a real treat.

1946: STATE AND BROAD ST.

Here's "Closeup" and touched up R.C. Maxwell photo of the J.B. Wilson Store at the corner of State and Broad Street back when Trenton was a viable center city shopping venue. How many of us strolled by that news stand that was there all during my years of going "up town?" Notice how the crowd is dressed! Ladies in beautiful "on the town" skirts and dresses, and gentlemen in sport shirts, slacks and other casual wear. HOW WE HAVE CHANGED!

Thursday, June 12, 2014

1951: THE GREAT ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC TEA COMPANY

The "Supermarket!" In our neighborhood it was on Hamilton Avenue between South Olden and South Logan Avenue. Red Circle, Bokar and 8 O'Clock coffee was ground while we waited. Let's see, there was "Sylvan Seal" milk, Jane Parker baked goods....and uhhh, any others I forgot? Oh, by the way, this one is a closeup view of the Prospect Street A&P.

1951: Marsh's Sewing Center and Hobby Shop

Marsh's: Something for the boys, something for the girls. Stores like this were literal magnets for those of us who caught the model building fever back in my young years. We had McEwen's Deli as a dealer for those ten cent (yes, 10 cent!) "Comet" model airplanes. But when we wanted to move up to the big leagues, it was off to Marsh's for those Guillow's models and other "upscale" balsa wood "stick" models as we called them. Here is a closeup view of that late, great model airplane shop where we bought "Testor's" or "Le Page's" glue and we also purchased our share of "dope;" and I don't mean drugs.Ask any veteran model builder what we were "using" as they say in this year of 2014!

1911 and 1923: RIKER'S DOWNTOWN DRUG STORE AND SODA FOUNTAIN

 
What charming old fashioned nostalgia comes upon us when we gaze upon an old fashioned drug store soda fountains. You remember drug stores, don't you? They sold drugs.....not be confused with the definition of the word today. I can imagine a Saturday night date with that lovely girl or one of them that I dreamed of back in my now ancient teen years, taking in a movie at the RKO Capitol, Trent, Lincoln and stopping in for an old fashioned ice cream soda! (Remember them?) Riker's was replaced by the Liggett chain of drug stores. On another note, the Kuser family sold the City Hall building which I added to the article above to the Lissner family back in the 1920's. (Little known historical fact)

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

1946: I WAS 13 AND JUST STARTING TO KNOW "DOWNTOWN" TRENTON

These incredibly fascinating photos are from the newly created "TRENTON-CLOSEUP VIEWS" folder in the Hamilton Township Public Library Local History Collection. They are copyright photos from the Duke University R.C. Maxwell collection, and the copyright information on each photo as required under the "Fair Use" portion of the U.S. Copyright act.  
Even though the Glover and other neighborhood families in the Liberty Street area didn't enter "downtown" Trenton via E. State Street, these views bring back a very sentimental journey into my 80 year old past. As can be seen in this incredibly detailed photo, Trenton was alive with local area residents long before there were those things we know of today as "Malls." With the rioting in the 1960's and the resulting white flight and commercial flight out of the city, Trenton lost a charm that those of us who remember that wonderful era will never forget. As we of the older generation move on, younger generations must be aware that there was a time when Trenton was a viable and clean capital city with shoppers dressed casually, modestly, and in good taste.