Saturday, August 01, 2015

1937: E. STATE "IN THE THEATER DISTRICT"

That would be E. State Street driving toward State and Broad Streets. I zoomed in on this beautiful scene of the Trenton of 1937 with those fabulous old cars lining both sides of East State Street. Thanks to image editing software, I was able to bring the area of the Orpheum theater from a deep black shadow with no detail By the way: the Orpheum became the Mayfair; one of my favorite Trenton theaters.

HISTORY SHOWS HOW TIMES HAVE CHANGED

How times have changed! Can you imagine religion at Trenton High School back during the "teens?" No, well check out the article above. A very common custom in all American schools back in the day.
Did you know the Democratic party was largely made up of racists in the post Civil War years? READ ON!

Friday, July 31, 2015

1955-1958 GLOVER, THOMAS L. RA 12480163

It's been sixty years since I donned that uniform and satisfied the obligation that those of my generation had to serve in the military.I ended up as a soldier in the U.S. Army. While I was in training at the U.S. Army Signal School in Fort Devens, Mass., the FBI and Lord knows how many other agencies were in my neighborhood asking if this soldier they were investigating for a secret military clearance was a good security candidate. I spent 6 months in Bad Aibling (Bavaria) Germany, then the rest of my tour in Aviano, Northern Italy attached to the United States Air Force's 629th AC&W Squadron. We were a detachment of army guys working out on the outskirts of the aircraft runway, doing our super secret mission in a little communications shack surrounded by a barb wire fence and our German Shepherd dog, "Hundt." (German for dog). Those air force guys didn't like us. They had to stand in formations, do KP, and dress like soldiers. We on the other hand lived like Hawkeye and Pierce on the TV show "MASH." It was the cold war era and Russia and the U.S. were standing nose to nose against each other and there was the chance that "the balloon would go up at any time." That balloon being the threat of another war. Our sensitive intelligence mission was such that we were the first to be evacuated in the event that the balloon did indeed go up, but thankfully it didn't.

2005: ANNUAL ST. ANTHONY RETREAT AT SAN ALFONSO RETREAT HOUSE

Here we are in the year 2015 and I took a fond look back at an on-screen presentation I produced to project on a movie screen. The above graphics are just two of the 5 or so views I put on the presentation. Looking back those ten years when I was in my early 70's, I get a twinge of bittersweet nostalgia as I remember those summers in July when I along with son Tom went on that annual retreat with fellow parishioners from churches all over the N.J. area. Precious memories. 

Thursday, July 30, 2015

1872: A CHAMBERSBURG WOULD WOULD NOT RECOGNIZE!

I have often written how prominent citizens of the past told of the early years of Robert Chambders' Chambersburg. Even though Robert's Chambersburg was the area of the old Chambersburg Hotel at Cass and South Broad Streets, the orchards, corn fields and open farm land were later taken over by developers and slowly but surely the area streets when laid out ultimately filled up with row upon row of adjoining houses. This map is one of my favorite views of the Burg as it looked in the year 1872. It is difficult to imagine that the area was so sparsely settled. The street names are dedicated to military officers from the Civil War.

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

2015: MUSIC: ONE OF GOD'S PRECIOUS GIFTS TO HUMANITY.

This article was saved for me by Jack Pyrah, my singing partner in our voluntary summer Kuser Park sing along programs. I do believe that mental stimulation can indeed keep the gray matter tuned up. Jack frequently comments on my ability to remember the lyrics to songs that are buried deep in yesteryear's music vault. I must admit that I also find it hard to believe that I can recall the lyrics to literally hundreds of songs that I remember from my youthful years. That is really the essence of our summer Kuser Park sing along program, "THE MUSIC WE GREW UP WITH," Jack gave me the article attached and as I read it, I realized that thus far, the Lord has allowed me to retain those lyrical music memories, In the attached photo, Ms. Nancy Briggs, one of my loyal concert followers, sings a duet with me as part of our sing-along custom.

Saturday, July 25, 2015

1805 AND 1806 TRENTON'S HISTORIC FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

 
 
In digging into the past history of the most famous Presbyterian church in the are, I came across a number of very interesting articles relating to the early years of the church and the search goes on. I found it particularly interesting as I dug way back to the years when the church was constructed in order to replace what was called the "Presbyterian Meeting House." Above are 3 very relevant articles that I have taken the time to embellish with appropriate tweaks in order to magnify the significance of these early 1800's news articles.

Friday, July 24, 2015

1933: THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ACT

1933: The year I was born. America was in the throes of what would become "The Great Depression." The economy was in the tank, unemployment and poverty was all around us. President Roosevelt signed the National Recovery Act which basically brought industry to a program of fair competition and price controls where possible. The photo above was on a huge R.C. Maxwell bill board that was once located on the north side of Perry Street at the intersection of North Warren Street. I have superimposed the very familiar "NRA" with the equally familiar "We Do Our Part" slogan emblazoned on the bottom of the ad. The ad was created in 1933, the year the NRA law was passed. You will see MANY very familiar Trenton commercial entities listed as committing to the NRA policies.

1932: DEDICATING THE TRENTON WHARF "PORT TRENTON"

Did you know that a deep Delaware stretched from Delaware Bay right up the Jersey-Pennsylvania sides of the Delaware up to South Trenton? Here's a fascinating set of graphics I put together telling just a small part of the story. Ships from all over the world came here and stories from some of my amateur radio contemporaries recall going aboard some of those ships as the DVRA (Delaware Valley Radio Association) members toured the various radio rooms aboard foreign vessels. Note also in the background, Lamberton Street homes are seen and in front of those homes, the old Farmers' Market stalls are seen. An interesting and informative peak at a time when America was in the depths of the Great Depression and Trenton was struggling with the rest of the nation.

Thursday, July 23, 2015

1933: EAST STATE & STOCKTON ST. - THE GREAT DEPRESSION

The city of Trenton is completely different from that of my young years. I would guess that the tallest buildings were the Broad Street Bank building and the Bell Telephone building. Today it is a completely different city. Indeed, a few years ago I went through the city when I was detoured from Hamilton Avenue en route to Sacred Heart church when I was a parishioner there. I had to detour to the freeway, exit at Perry Street, then to No. Warren and down toward the center of the city. WHAT A CHANGE! I realized how Rip Van Winkle must have felt after taking that long nap.
High rise glass encrusted building all over the place!
By the way: The Auburn Cord dealer was included at the bottom of the graphic; a special gift to our automotive historian.

1876: HAMILTON'S ST. MARY'S CEMETERY

 

The year 2016 will mark the 145th anniversary of St. Mary's Cemetery where many of our local citizens are resting until called by the Lord to be with Him. St. Mary's is a beautiful cemetery and a leisurely stroll along the pathways will reveal MANY familiar family name of those who have gone before us. 

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

1934: HUDSON AND ELMER STREETS, "THE BURG"

I posted this very detailed R.C. Maxwell Chambersburg view some time ago. I have re-formatted the original image in order to get a better close up view of the adjoining buildings as referred to by my friend and fellow classmate, Lee Belardino.  This post, like many of these R.C. Maxwell copyrighted photos, garnered a number of interesting comments. Below are the comments; and additional comments are welcomed.
:

Thanks to Tom Krawiec for correcting my former caption where I erroneously listed building being on the Corner of Division St. and Emory Avenue. Eagle eye Tom noted that the street sign clearly says Elmer. Your input is really appreciated, Tom. Thanks for the heads up on my error. Once again, thanks to Duke University Archives for this exquisite photo from R.C. Maxwell.

Anonymous Anonymous said...
http://mackstruckofwisdom.blogspot.com/2011/09/mazzillis-market-hudson-street-burg.html
Tuesday, December 13, 2011
Blogger Tom Glover said...
THANKS, ANONYMOUS. I COULDN'T FIND THE BUILDING ON HUDSON STREET, BUT IT HAS PROBABLY BEEN MODIFIED AS LISTED IN MACK'S POST OF MAZZILI PERSONNEL. THE BING BUILDING ON THE CORNER OF DIVISION SURE LOOKS LOOKED LIKE IT, BUT THANKS TO MACK, WE KNOW THEY WERE ON EMERY AND HUDSON WHERE THERE IS NO CONVENTIONAL CORNER.
TOM GLOVER
Tuesday, December 13, 2011
Lee Belardino said...
Tommy: Mazzilli and Battisti were located on the corner of Hudson and Elmer. Next door was Popkin's shoe store where I worked when I was 12 years old 3days a week after 6 and all day Saturday. Used to flirt with Battisti Mazzilli girls who sometimes gave me free Tasty cakes.

THANKS, LEE. It's nice to post photos that you all can relate to. Stay tuned....there will be more.
Tom
Tom Krawiec said...
The street sign over top of the store's front door say's "Elmer St"
Tom Glover said...
THANKS, TOM KRAWIEC:

I MADE A MISTAKE AND ENTERED EMORY. THANKS FOR THAT EAGLE EYE! I AM CHANGING IT.

TOM GLOVER

5 comments:

Anonymous said...
http://mackstruckofwisdom.blogspot.com/2011/09/mazzillis-market-hudson-street-burg.html
Tom Glover said...
THANKS, ANONYMOUS. I COULDN'T FIND THE BUILDING ON HUDSON STREET, BUT IT HAS PROBABLY BEEN MODIFIED. THE ONE ON THE CORNER OF DIVISION SURE LOOKS LIKE IT.
TOM GLOVER
Lee Belardino said...
Tommy,Mazzili and Battisti were located on the corner of Hudson and Elmer . Next door was Popkins shoe store where I worked when I was 12 years old 3days a week after 6 and all day Saturday. Used to flirt with Battisti Mazzili girls who sometimes gave me free Tasty cakes.
Tom Krawiec said...
The street sign over top of the store's front door say's "Elmer St"
Tom Glover said...
THANKS, TOM KRAWIEC:

I MADE A MISTAKE AND ENTERED EMORY. THANKS FOR THAT EAGLE EYE! I AM CHANGING IT.

TOM GLOVER

Friday, July 17, 2015

TO ALL MY FRIENDS AND RELATIVES WHO LIVE OR LIVED IN EWING TOWNSHIP: HERE IS A LONG READ FROM THE MANY PEOPLE WHO VISITED THIS WEBSITE. WITH A FEW GRAPHICS SHOWING THE EWING OF YEARS GONE BY. IT IS HERE THAT YOU WILL FIND NOT ONLY MY MEMORIES OF EWING, BUT THAT OF MANY WHO REMEMBER EWING WHEN IT WAS A MUCH MORE RURAL AREA OF MERCER COUNTY. READ ON: 

Ewing became very familiar to me back in the 1950's when I made my daily commute to 1812 North Olden Avenue in Ewing to what would ultimately be a dead end job at the old Trenton Bearings Company where I worked for over 40 years and didn't even get a thank you Timex watch. I remember patrolman Bellando of the Ewing police force, and after more then 60 years memories of Ewing will be with me always. Speaking of Ewing, do you remember Bill Blackwell's? The Pioneer? Jack and Bob's? The Glendale? Frank Ayre's Esso Station? Cook's Luncheonette on Parkway Avenue? Trenton Axle, Wheel and Brake? Lee's Pharmacy? Vernam's Dairy? Ryan's Dairy, The Ewing Drive In? Marty's Frozen Custard Stand? Moffatt Bearing Co.? Lanning School? Fisk School? Union Op? Breihler's? Biter's Transfer? The first MacDonald's in the area, on North Olden Avenue with burgers for 15 cents each? Mrs. G's? Electrolux? The Garden Supply Co. on Pennington Road, Wow! I'm impressed at how many I remember. Any other Ewing persons, places, and things, are very welcome for inclusion in this post.
FOLLOWING ARE A FEW OF THE COMMENTS I GOT 
FROM FOLKS WHO REMEMBER EWING:

TOM:
Congrats on your well-deserved commendation from Hamilton Township!
I have to ask: I remember the name "Union Op," but have no recollection of what it was? Can you fill us in?
Many thanks.(As I recall, It was a primitive Walmart type store, Bill)
Here's another memory relating to that particular part of the world: remember the House of Hi-Fi?
Love your blog.
Bill Smith
Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Mack said...
I worked at Wendy's on North Olden.remember Seafood Shanty and Korvettes. My Dad had an office on Parkway near the High School (Appraisal
Exchange)..Lenny's Gas Station near that as was a Chinese Restaurant and the Pizza place across the street. Cousins lived on Heath Street I remember that hill and Deli Delite. I remember the bug spraying truck coming by in summer. As a kid from the Burg I never saw a bug truck before. I also remember the Halo Farms. I remember Dales on the circle too:)

From Noel Goeke
Tom,
Just a few memories of Ewing I'd like to share.We bought our first living room set from Korvettes, 1 sofa, 2 chairs, 2 end tables and 2 lamps for $199. Breihlers had the best ice cream sundaes on earth and Lee's Pharmacy also had a lunch counter where we ate many suppers. I could go on about places in Ewing that we went to.
Noel

Anonymous Anonymous said...
There was a small Tomato Pie place called Whitey's wedged into that slice of land on Olden just past Arctic Parkway and the pie was exceptional. In the early 60's across from Korvette's was the Blue Moon Diner and they built a hot dog eatery like McDonalds next to it called Franksville, that became Special Pizza City which is still there. Whitey had the best pie in that corner of Ewing
Ed Millerick
Tuesday, November 29, 2011


Sally Logan Gilman said...
Hi Tom: It's been six yesrs since my husband and I have been in Trenton. It was for the funeral of our dear friend Connie DeRemigis who lived in Ewing. You mention the new Parkway Diner -- is it new since we were there last? There was once a tomato pie place on Parkway, across from the diner.I can't remember the name. My family shopped on Olden Ave. and there were some great tomato pie places along there too. You see where my menories are centered. Regards
Monday, November 28, 2011

Michael said...
Tom:
Here I am down south minding my p & Q's,when you come along again, and pique my memmory about No. Olden Ave!
EJ Korvettes arrived at what was to become Capitol Plaza, after Phil Leavitt bought the tract from the Pennsylvania Railroad. A little known real estate novice from South Trenton had put togeter a group of his buddies from the Trenton Elks lodge 105 consisting of Andy Caola, Bill Beitle, Jack Moran to compete with Leavitt for this former Pony farm. When everyone finished calling us crazy, the first real Shopping center came to fruition.
I played Soccer on that Vacant land, and the Vegotsky family had a stand on the corner of Princeton and Olden, across from Extenion Patio.
Union Op was located west of the Plaza, just past "Jay's Kiddierama".
I don't recall a "Parkway Diner" as Sally mentions, but the original Parkside Diner was run by Johnny Rasomovich and his family for many, many years. Across Olden Ave. was the Sherwood Inn, where Russ Radice and his band held court virutally every weekend of the 50's. Was Sally thinking of "Pizza City" across from Union Op, next to the railroad tracks?
It was near the metall fabicator ultimatey owned by Sid Sussman that became what is now Home Depot (?). How about Olden Paint & Carpet, Don Young's, Dollittle and
Allen furniture, Johnny Koslowski's fine furniture across the street. Remember Earl Cathcart's Ponitac dealiership at the corner of Olden and Artic?
House of Hi Fi, great guy owned it, was next to Coronet Appliance sales, just down from where Mrs. G relocated when the City bought her property "New Jersey Plumbing Supply" next ot Van Sciver's on South Broad St.
Now the coup de grace; Feeling poorly, and had to see a vascular surgeon down here. I asked the nurse where Dr. Piotrowski was fron since there were so many in the Trenton area. She replied "Pittsburg". When I met him, and asked about Pittsburg, he said Pittsburg, I grew up in Yardley, and spent most of my time with relatives in Ewing Township!
Turns out he worked at Carvel's for fifteen years with his cousins who lived just behind the AAMCO shop on the corner. Small world, getting smaller!
Leo Smolar was the first McDonald's franchisee on Olden ave, He was from Chicago, abd went on to control all of central NJ'golden arches. Olden Ave, cost him $25,000. for the exclusive rights.
Now the question: Was it "Alantic Mills" that was fitted into the old Industrial building Helen Bohme owned next to Frank Rasimovich's go go bar that u;timately burned down and was across Olden Ave. from Capitol Plaza? I know the answer lies within the reader's of this marvelous column.
Warm regards
Mike Kuzma
Monday, November 28, 2011

Anonymous said...
Back in the 1950's the intersection of Olden and Princeton centered around the Extension Fields of the local soccer clubs, they would be razed to make way for Capitol Plaza anchored by E. J. Korvettes and my our favorite ice cream place Costa Cottage, a laundromat and McCrory 5&10 and Sav-On Drugs.
Prior to all of that just before Capitol Motors on the corner of Arctic Parkway was Union Op which was a not so classy department store that mostly made it's money from the large arcade on the north end that was filled with pin-ball machines. You had to be careful because that was the hang out of the "hoodlums" with the "DA" haircuts and motor cycle boots that lived in the Donnelly Homes. The other corner of Princeton and Olden was Extension Patio followed by Reed Hardware and Mower shop, Extension Tavern, Bounceland trampolines and The 19'th Hole driving range. Two diners on Princeton Avenue (the original US1) were the places to eat Fritz's and the one that was razed for Gino's, The Uncle Sam Diner. Lang's Ski would later build a "swiss chalet" peak on the arcade plaza of the Union Op building and open for business. The moved down Olden and are still open as Lang's Ski & Scuba.
Ed Millerick
Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Anonymous said...
Sally, there was a small Tomato Pie place called Whitey's wedged into that slice of land on Olden just past Arctic Parkway and the pie was exceptional. In the early 60's across from Korvette's was the Blue Moon Diner and they built a hot dog eatery like McDonalds next to it called Franksville, that became Special Pizza City which is still there. Whitey had the best pie in that corner of Ewing
Ed Millerick
Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Sally Logan Gilman said...
Ed: Thank you so much for the info on Whitey's -- my friend Connie and I used to go there. It was on the right hand side just past Arctic Parkway like you said. We loved it there. Such yummy memories. It was great pie. Thanks again Ed for jogging my memory.
Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Anonymous said...
Wow! Some great memories of Ewing! I worked at The Glendale Inn and at Briehlers. When the Generals Quarters restaurant opened at Mercer County Airport I worked there for 12 years. Remembering most places spoke of here. Also remember The Parfait House. It's a shame that they tore down both the Parfait house(years ago) and the Glendale(about a year ago). Thanks for all the memories! John
Friday, November 23, 2012

Bud Patel said...
You wouldn't have a photo of the old glendale pharmacy in ewing would you?
Sunday, April 21, 2013

Anonymous said...
Born in 57', my pop worked at Addressograph on the Brunswick Circle, spent a lot of time growing up doing all types of family things on/around N.Olden Ave. Landmarks remembered, Murphy's Chuck wagon @ Olden & Prospect, who could forget Phillip's Ewing Bazaar?, mentioned earlier here Whitey's (Great $3.00 large pizza), Parfait House, which became Stoy's (spelling) Ice Cream Parlour, The Sherwood Inn, Mike's Steakhouse-near McDonalds on the same side of Olden Ave, Don Youngs-went to high school with his kids. Gr8 Blog/Thanks for the memories !
Monday, June 10, 2013

dean cliver said...
I grew up in ewing and do I remember a lot of places I used to love to go to.i went to ewing high class of 62 we used to hang at mikes steak house the best chesse steaks ever,pops tomatoe pies and they did not fit in the box,and then the broken drum on prospect street,oh the memories
Monday, November 17, 2014

Robert Zuczek said...
For those of you who have commented on the diner at the corner of Olden and Parkside Ave. I would like to set the record straight. it was the Extension Diner which was established by my parents, John and Edlina Zuczek in 1946. My family owned and operated the diner until 1990. We sold the business and the new owners changed the name to the Parkside Diner. There have been two more owners since then, with the current name of the diner being The Two Peters Diner.

A note from Tom to Bob Zuczek: Your dad was a prince of a man. Few men worked harder than he did. I was a daily visitor to the Extension back in 1952 when I started working for the Trenton Bearing Company at 1812 North Olden Avenue Extension. One of his waitresses that I remember after all these years was a gal I only knew as "Ann." She was a very nice and cordial lady.

Tom Glover






Thursday, July 16, 2015

1951: LOUISE BAIRD. A SECOND MOTHER TO JUDY AND ME



As anyone who has followed the hundreds of columns I have written over the years will agree, Miss Louise S. Baird, the vocal music teacher at Hamilton High School during Judy Britton Glover and Tom Glover's attraction to this incredible lady has left an indelible impression on both our lives. Those of us were privileged to have been in her music classes as choral singers will agree that we not only learned how to sing in 8 part harmony, we also learned about the cultural and theological aspect of living. After we graduated together in 1951, my dear wife Judy and I maintained almost daily contact with Miss Baird, or as she was known to her very closest friends, "Ouise" pronounced "Weeze." At the time of our graduation in 1951 Miss Baird was caring for her aging mother and it was that summer that she passed away, leaving Ouise alone and very lonely. Judy and I loved being with her as she taught us the wisdom of the ages as seen in the 5 or 6 scrapbooks that she kept with notable quotations from the likes of Helen Steiner Rice, Kahlil Gibran and other deep thinkers. She also had a delightful piano in her Hamilton Avenue apartment and would always sit down and play our favorite musical pieces. Judy's was "Traumeri," and mine was the "Moonlight Sonata." To be honest, Ouise is largely responsible for the man I have become. She has left me with memories of some of her quotes which she said every man should live by. Three of them are alive and well in my lesson on living: "Greatness is Humble," "The true test of a man's character is what he would do if he would never be found out," "Though you travel the world over in search of the beautiful, you must carry it with you or you find it not," and this gem from Keats: "A thing of beauty is a joy forever; its loveliness increases. It will never pass into nothingness."

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

1940: THE NEW LINCOLN HOMES - IN THE VERY BEGINNING

I have a number of the old "TRENTON" magazines in my collection and it is a bittersweet journey back to the years when Trenton was a thriving community with factories, retail stores and neighborhood development. The article above was  enhanced and tweaked via Photo  Shop graphic software. It is an interesting look at the new Lincoln Homes that were just completed. Note especially the lower part of the first column: "Lincoln Homes, designed for negro residents...." A good in your face example of what was known as segregated housing back before the middle of the 20th century. Today, I have "negro" (I hate that word) neighbors all around me here in the Bromley section and we get along beautifully; our colors don't rub off.

Thursday, July 09, 2015

1909: CAVALERIA RUSTICANA

Were it not for Miss Louise Simpson Baird, my Hamilton High School Julliard educated music teacher, I and many other alumni of Hamilton High School would never have been exposed to Kahlil Gibran, Italian opera, John Keats, William Shakespeare, Helen Steiner Rice and other cultural giants, now recognized by a relatively small minority in today's society. The above photo of St. Joachim's in Chambersburg announces the operatic presentations being presented back in 1909. Of special interest to me is the presentation of Mascagni's Cavaleria Rusticana which contains the song that "Ouise" (pronounced "Wheeze") Baird taught those of us high school students who were lovers of music. Incredibly lovely music emanated from the room 300 tower at Hamilton High School during my years there. One of the most heavenly pieces she taught us to sing was "Intermezzo from Cavaleria Rusticana," or as we called it "The Prayer from Cavaleria Rusticana." It always brought me to tears it was so beautiful as we sang the English lyrics to this ethereal musical masterpiece in incredible harmony. Certainly Mr. Mascagni is firmly leading a heavenly choir today along with Louise Baird.

Wednesday, July 08, 2015

2015 ENTERING WEEK FIVE OF HAMILTON'S SUMMER CONCERT SERIES


Here's an update on my 9th annual Kuser Park Gazebo summer Sunday sing along series. Last  Sunday and the Sunday before saw about 70 music lovers coming out to the bucolic shady glen at Kuser Park and enjoying 2 hours of songs; songs ranging from love songs, to hymns and songs of faith, and the songs of Rosemary Clooney, Joni James, Frank Sinatra, Perry Como, well, you get the idea; music that has a melody, understandable lyrics and is as far from "Acid Rock," "Rap," and "hip hop" as the East is from the West. The event is free. My partner Jack Pyrah and I are not professional singers, but we can both carry a tune and bounce around some harmony now and then, and by the sound of last week's crowd as we sang the National Anthem and "God Bess America," most of them could also belt out a very nice sound! Come on out Trenton, Ewing, Pennington, Princeton.....the water's fi....oops, scuse me, the music's fine and fun!

Tuesday, July 07, 2015

2015: KENNY GLOVER: LANDSCAPER EXTRAORDANAIRE

The top photo is the original planting back in mid May when my son Ken constructed the terrace around the huge Sycamore tree on my front lawn. Below is a closeup of just a few of the flowers which have thrived in this newly found treasure. My emotions bring a tear to my eye as I think how my dear Judy would have loved this work of art. Somehow I feel that she is smiling down on on our Atlantic Avenue home as she gazes at a floral delight that dad had no talent to achieve. I love those 
"Gerbera Daisies!"

2015: PLEASE SOMEONE; SAVE HAMILTON'S HISTORIC BROMLEY INN!

 
Back in 1897 when Mr. Charles Fulkert a South Trenton saloon owner, opened the Bromley Inn, little did he know that he was creating an historic edifice that would become a perfect gathering place for prominent persons from all over the east coast who were harness racing horse owners and race fans and very active in the Lexington Kentucky style harness racing track at financier Henry N. Smith's Fashion Stud Farm. General Grant and other notables kept one of his horses in the stables at the stud farm. For those unfamiliar with the aforementioned racing venue, the stud farm was located in the area of today's Grounds For Sulpture and of course the late, lamented "Interstate Fair;" more familiarly known known as the New Jersey State Fair. Sadly, the Bromley Inn is falling into a sad physical state as it sits abandoned and forlornly on Route 33. We are very encouraged by the news that there is going to be a Walmart placed on the site which will serve as an anchor store in the new shopping center. A tip of the hat to our town fathers for bringing this worthy project to fruition. I would bet that the new shopping center will be a popular and much needed asset to those of us who are residents of the Bromley area. It would also be the ideal time for a history minded entity to capitalize on the popularity of the Grounds For Sculpture area, and look to the possibilities of the Bromley Inn for preservation and utilization. As a 60 year resident of Bromley (Greenwood Village 1950 and currently Atlantic Avenue,) Sincere thanks to Hamilton Township's Economic Development people for what could be a new positive future for aging Bromley; a great old neighborhood that I perceive to be a community in need of attention.

Monday, July 06, 2015

2015: TOM'S HISTORY LESSON FOR TODAY

 
Did you know that when you approach the White Horse circle from Bordentown that you are entering one of the oldest and most historic areas in Mercer County? As you cross the bridge crossing Crosswicks Creek, you are passing by the old draw bridge that was there during the Colonial era. There was a rebel skirmish at that location back during the Revolutionary war. Furthermore, as you pass by and look to your right, along the NORTH shore of Crosswicks Creek, You are looking at the site of the former Robert Pearson House; long since removed and now the approximate location of an apartment complex. As you reach the infamous White Horse Circle and make your turn on to Sout Broad Street. The site of the very historic White Horse Tavern comes into view. (See the Google Map; I have superimposed the old tavern on its original site.) That's your history lesson for today.