Friday, August 28, 2015

2015: WWII HISTORY IF FLYING INTO MERCER AIRPORT!

THIS WAS EMAILED TO ME THIS MORNING. THE PHOTOS ARE FROM THE WEBSITE CITED BELOW.
For Immediate Release
The Wings of Freedom Tour of the WWII Vintage Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, Consolidated B-24 Liberator and North American P-51 Mustang Announce Unique Display in Trenton at Trenton Mercer Airport from August 31 to September 2
In honor of our WWII Veterans ~ The Collings Foundation’s Wings of Freedom Tour Brings Extremely Rare Bomber and Fighter Aircraft for Local Living History Display as Part of 110-city Nationwide Tour
WHAT: Participating in the Collings Foundation’s WINGS OF FREEDOM TOUR, the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress “Nine O Nine” WWII Heavy Bomber, Consolidated B-24 Liberator “Witchcraft” WWII Heavy Bomber and P-51 Mustang fighter, will fly into Trenton Mercer Airport in Trenton, NJ for a visit from August 31 to September 2. This is a rare opportunity to visit, explore, and learn more about these unique and rare treasures of aviation history. The B-17 is one of only 8 in flying condition in the United States, the B-24J and Full Dual Control P-51C Mustang are the sole remaining examples of their type flying in the World. Visitors are invited to explore the aircraft inside and out - $12 for adults and $6 for children under 12 is requested for access to up-close viewing and tours through the inside of the aircraft. WWII Veterans can tour through the aircraft at no cost. Discounted rates for school groups. Visitors may also experience the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to actually take a 30-minute flight aboard these rare aircraft. Flights on either the B-17 or B-24 are $450 per person. Get some “stick time” in the world’s greatest fighter! P-51 flights are $2,200 for a half hour and $3,200 for a full hour. For reservations and information on flight experiences call 800-568-8924.
WHERE: The WINGS OF FREEDOM TOUR will be on display at Trenton Mercer Airport in Trenton located at Landmark Aviation 300 Scotch Road.
WHEN: The WINGS OF FREEDOM TOUR will arrive at Trenton Mercer Airport at 2:00 PM on August 31 and will be on display at Landmark Aviation at Trenton Mercer Airport until the aircraft departs September 2 after 12:00 PM. Hours of ground tours and display are: 2:00 PM through 5:00 PM on Monday, August 31; 9:00 AM through 5:00 PM on Tuesday, September 1; 9:00 AM through 12:00 PM on Wednesday, September 2. The 30-minute flight experiences are normally scheduled before and after the ground tour times above.
WHO: The Collings Foundation is a 501c3 non-profit educational foundation devoted to organizing “living history” events that allows people to learn more about their heritage and history through direct participation. The Nationwide WINGS OF FREEDOM TOUR is celebrating its 26th year and visits an average of 110 cities in over 35 states annually. Since its start, tens of millions of people have seen the B-17, B-24 & P-51 display at locations everywhere. The WINGS OF FREEDOM tour is one of the most extraordinary and unique interactive traveling historical displays of its kind.
WHY: The WINGS OF FREEDOM TOUR travels the nation a flying tribute to the flight crews who flew them, the ground crews who maintained them, the workers who built them, the soldiers, sailors and airmen they helped protect; and the citizens and families that share the freedom that they helped preserve. The B-17 & B-24 were the backbone of the American effort during the war from 1942 to 1945 and were famous for their ability to sustain damage and still accomplish the mission. Despite the risks of anti-aircraft fire, attacking enemy fighters, and the harrowing environment of sub-zero temperatures, many B-17s and B-24s safely brought their crews home. The P-51 Mustang was affectionately known as the bombers “Little Friend” – saving countless crews from attacking axis fighters. After the war, many aircraft were scrapped for their raw aluminum to rebuild a nation in post-war prosperity and therefore very few were spared. The rarity of the B-17, B-24 & P-51 - and their importance to telling the story of WWII is why the Collings Foundation continues to fly and display the aircraft nationwide. At each location we encourage local veterans and their families to visit and share their experiences and stories with the public. For aviation enthusiasts, the tour provides opportunity for the museum to come to the visitor and not the other way around! Visitors can find out more by visiting our website at .www.collingsfoundation.org
For further information e-mail Hunter Chaney, Director of Marketing: hchaney@collingsfoundation.org or 800-568-8924.

My generation invented holes in our trousers, socks, patches in our trousers, hand me downs and didn't know we were fashion plates. I guess this is where the fashionable term "grunge" originated.
Believe me, we would much rather have had the luxury of wearing anything but hand me downs or as I guess we should have called them, "grunge wear."

Thursday, August 27, 2015

1840'S AND 1950's: WHEN THE WORD "WHOLESOME" WAS IN VOGUE.

I wonder if our educators ever use the word "etiquette" in the class room in this year of 2015. Words like "wholesome," "good grooming," "Sir Galahad," etc. seem to have been placed on the top of a dusty cob-web shelf and out of the social mainstream and categorized as relics of the dark ages. Well folks, I'm here to tell you that we did indeed often hear the aforementioned words and phrases and many of us still practice those fast fading customs. Check out the above photo and you will see what I mean.

1950's: BRING THEM BACK, PLEASE!

I wrote this column way back in 1992. As I re-read it, I began to mentally think about all the moral decay and sheer decadence is overtaking America. In New York City, topless females are parading around demanding equal rights for women. "If men can go around with bare chests, why not women." Another male member of the porcine species was also completely nude in public  IN FRONT OF ANY CHILDREN WHO MAY BE TOURING THE CITY WITH MOMMY AND DADDY! Evil is rearing its ugly head. Put a "D" in front of that word and I would guess that's how the word "evil" was added to our English language. I am going to keep the column I wrote those many years ago and print it out on my tabloid printer and have a full size article to retreat to whenever I read, hear or see such  disgusting behavior which is being allowed to exist due to an increasingly permissive society. GOD IS WATCHING US!

Sunday, August 23, 2015

1935: IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN "THE GREAT DEPRESSION" BUT LIFE WENT ON

FFrom a 1935 full page ad in the Trenton Evening Times proves that even though we were in the throes of the "Great Depression," life went on in Trenton and the surrounding areas.

Saturday, August 22, 2015

1988: "DO YOU RMEMBER THESE?"

I wrote this column nearly 30 years ago recalling things that came to my mind as I did a mental inventory of the persons, places and things I recall that are no longer part of our daily lives. After some Monday morning quarterbacking, I realized that I should have entitled it, "I REMEMBER THESE."

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

2006: TOM GLOVER WONDERS HOW MY VIEWERS REMEMBER THE MUSIC OF THE 1950'S.

DO NOT PEEK AT THE SECTION AT THE BOTTOM OF THE COLUMN WITH THE "GLOVER" headline. The answers to this quiz are there and I want you to honestly see how many of those great old songs you remember with the clues I have furnished. I sing almost every one of these songs at my Kuser Gazebe singalongs, and over the years have sung them at countless senior citizen centers.
NO PEEKING!

Monday, August 17, 2015

1951: LOVELY DARA BROWN, CNBC AND MSNBC PERSONALITY

This lovely gal is the daughter of my Hamilton High class of 1951 classmate, Karen Peterson Brown.
I am an avid watcher of MSNBC's "Lockup," (and Lockup only.) I am personally not a fan of their far left  agenda.Like "The Gray Lady," New York Times. "All the News that fits."

Saturday, August 15, 2015

1896: THE KUSER MANSION WAS BUILT AND FINISHIED IN 1896, NOT 1892

 Unfortunately, when the township took over the Kuser Farm area back in the 1970's, they were also given the hand written diary kept by either Fred or Theresa Kuser which had an entry dated 1892 stating that they "spent their first day in their new country home." They were referring to the Goldy farm house which was on Olden Avenue at Cedar Street ( Today's Cedar Lane.) Given the extensive research I have done over the years on the Kuser Farm and family, I would bet that even Fritz Kuser thought they were referring to today's Kuser mansion.

Friday, August 14, 2015

1937: HOMEDELL SCHOOL SAFETY PATROL

 

Do you remember
THE KEYSTONE AUTOMOBILE CLUB
SAFTEY PATROL?
Here's a photo of the Homedell School patrol from 1937

1946 - Trenton Central High School

1946 - Trenton Central High School


There they are, the Central High School Service Corps! There is a possibility that a relative is shown in the photo.
Remember, you can click on the right mouse button, click on "Save Target As," and move the file to your computer for printing.
 

I am rapidly increasing my Hamilton Library Local History Collection of R.C. Maxwell photos of Trenton and the local area, following Duke University's instructions as to how to use them under the U.S. Copyright "Fair Use" law with credit and Duke Library call number on each each photo. Our first Hamilton Township Historical Society presentation in September (the Monday FOLLOWING Labor Day) will feature an on screen program using the library's huge movie scree to project these incredible photos in full screen size on the library's lenticular movie screen. The photos displayed here show only a portion of the originals  as I zeroed in on the corner of Front and So. Broad Street. (The tower of the Broad Street Methodist church can be seen at the far upper left of the photo.) also focusing on the White Horse Tavern in the accompanying Maxwell photo.

Thursday, August 13, 2015

1944: "TO ALL THE GIRLS I LOVED BEFORE"

What a sad state of affairs! Poor spelling along with a manufacturer's engraving error, gave young Tom Glover a very perplexing situation. However, as you will read, it ultimately turned out OK!

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

2105: TIME OUT FOR A GIGGLE OR TWO OR THREE OR?

NO COMMENTARY NEEDED FOR THIS GRAPHIC; IT LAUGHS FOR ITSELF.

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

HHS 1951: BILL BAGGOTT-: HE COULD HAVE BEEN A STAR AT THE METROPOLITAN OPERA

My memories of my years as a member of Louise Baird's Hamilton High School choir are alive and vivid and will be with me forever. It was such a privilege to have been a member all four years of my high school career. Certain members stood out. Bette Beiger (Farmer) was one of our lovely female leads in our operettas, as was Shirley Whitebread and the young man in the article I wrote a number of years ago, Bill Baggott. Bill had the tenor voice of an angel. Anyone who watched or watches Lawrence Welk is familiar with Joe Feeney. To me, he has a very harsh tenor voice. I remember Louise Baird commenting one night when Judy and I were at her apartment when she made the comment that BIll's voice was far superior to Feeney's; especially Bill's falsetto.

1917 and 1925: HAMILTON TOWNSHIP'S NOTORIOUS "CLAY PITS"

 
"Dogtown:" Back in the late 19th and early 20th century the area where today's Hamilton Police Station and the Hamilton Library are located, and more specifically the area we know of today as "downtown Hamilton was known as "Dogtown." It was located near the intersection of White Horse-Mercerville Road and encompassed the area eastward and presumably was part of what we know of today as the "Morton Tract."  The strange neighborhood earned that strange name due to the fact that there were apparently a proliferation of dogs running loose around the area. Dogtown was also one of Hamilton's historic and notorious "Clay Pits." Trenton was a very viable pottery center back in the aforementioned late 19th and into the mid 20th century. Potteries needed very densely composed clay for use as "saggers;" a necessary product needed in molding pottery. I have been searching for historic information on this little known area of Hamilton and found the two articles above which will give a very detailed glimpse into the history of that old neighborhood and it's importance to the local pottery industry. On a personal note, the abandoned clay pits provided a very dangerous swimming area for many young boys back in the day. Mom Glover made it perfectly clear that the Glover boys were to avoid the hazardous swimming area which in later years had filled up with water and in many areas of the water equally hazardous Cedar stumps under the water. I remember when a Kuser School
student was killed when he drowned in those waters. I remember the clay pits as being very close to the area where the Hamilton Elks building and the office suites are located.

Saturday, August 08, 2015

1986: TWENTY NINE YEARS AGO AND I STILL REMEMBER

Back in the 1940's when Don Slabicki and I worked for Fred Kuser, we made monthly trips over to Newtown Pennsylvania to the George School where we presented 20th Century Fox movies to the students on Saturday nights. The trip to that affluent campus was far different from today. The road leading out of Newtown to the school was a rambling two lane road with Burma Shave signs posted along the road. I remember how clever those little signs were and how we eagerly awaited the next line in the poetic gem. Beards were not a common thing on men back then and Burma Shave wanted it to stay that way.

Wednesday, August 05, 2015

1960: HAMILTON HIGH CLASS OF 1960 TO CELEBRATE 55 YEARS!



 Above are three graphics relating to the upcoming 55th reunion of Hamilton High's class of 1960. Thanks to my Hamilton Historical Society colleague Eleanor Goldy Guear. I have tried to incorporate all the necessary information on the reunion into a single page but it was an impossible task. I had to break them down into separate pages as displayed above.

Below are images from another dear friend, Kathleen Csorgo Annaccarato who obviously treasured her years at the best high school in the United States of America. Kathy's dad was a fellow amateur radio and personal friend of mine.
 My favorite musical in the whole world! I would loved to have played the part of Billy Bigelow!
 Ann Peters was a Glover family friend who lived "up the hill" at 35 Hartley Avenue.
 I am indebted to the late Alice Wilhelm who gave me her complete collection of Hamilton High memorabilia from her years as one of the first faculty members of the school when it opened back in the 1930's.
 
 Below are 3 more keepsakes from Kathy and her obvious fondness for HHS '60



Saturday, August 01, 2015

1937: E. STATE "IN THE THEATER DISTRICT"

That would be E. State Street driving toward State and Broad Streets. I zoomed in on this beautiful scene of the Trenton of 1937 with those fabulous old cars lining both sides of East State Street. Thanks to image editing software, I was able to bring the area of the Orpheum theater from a deep black shadow with no detail By the way: the Orpheum became the Mayfair; one of my favorite Trenton theaters.

HISTORY SHOWS HOW TIMES HAVE CHANGED

How times have changed! Can you imagine religion at Trenton High School back during the "teens?" No, well check out the article above. A very common custom in all American schools back in the day.
Did you know the Democratic party was largely made up of racists in the post Civil War years? READ ON!

Friday, July 31, 2015

1955-1958 GLOVER, THOMAS L. RA 12480163

It's been sixty years since I donned that uniform and satisfied the obligation that those of my generation had to serve in the military.I ended up as a soldier in the U.S. Army. While I was in training at the U.S. Army Signal School in Fort Devens, Mass., the FBI and Lord knows how many other agencies were in my neighborhood asking if this soldier they were investigating for a secret military clearance was a good security candidate. I spent 6 months in Bad Aibling (Bavaria) Germany, then the rest of my tour in Aviano, Northern Italy attached to the United States Air Force's 629th AC&W Squadron. We were a detachment of army guys working out on the outskirts of the aircraft runway, doing our super secret mission in a little communications shack surrounded by a barb wire fence and our German Shepherd dog, "Hundt." (German for dog). Those air force guys didn't like us. They had to stand in formations, do KP, and dress like soldiers. We on the other hand lived like Hawkeye and Pierce on the TV show "MASH." It was the cold war era and Russia and the U.S. were standing nose to nose against each other and there was the chance that "the balloon would go up at any time." That balloon being the threat of another war. Our sensitive intelligence mission was such that we were the first to be evacuated in the event that the balloon did indeed go up, but thankfully it didn't.

2005: ANNUAL ST. ANTHONY RETREAT AT SAN ALFONSO RETREAT HOUSE

Here we are in the year 2015 and I took a fond look back at an on-screen presentation I produced to project on a movie screen. The above graphics are just two of the 5 or so views I put on the presentation. Looking back those ten years when I was in my early 70's, I get a twinge of bittersweet nostalgia as I remember those summers in July when I along with son Tom went on that annual retreat with fellow parishioners from churches all over the N.J. area. Precious memories. 

Thursday, July 30, 2015

1872: A CHAMBERSBURG WOULD WOULD NOT RECOGNIZE!

I have often written how prominent citizens of the past told of the early years of Robert Chambders' Chambersburg. Even though Robert's Chambersburg was the area of the old Chambersburg Hotel at Cass and South Broad Streets, the orchards, corn fields and open farm land were later taken over by developers and slowly but surely the area streets when laid out ultimately filled up with row upon row of adjoining houses. This map is one of my favorite views of the Burg as it looked in the year 1872. It is difficult to imagine that the area was so sparsely settled. The street names are dedicated to military officers from the Civil War.

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

2015: MUSIC: ONE OF GOD'S PRECIOUS GIFTS TO HUMANITY.

This article was saved for me by Jack Pyrah, my singing partner in our voluntary summer Kuser Park sing along programs. I do believe that mental stimulation can indeed keep the gray matter tuned up. Jack frequently comments on my ability to remember the lyrics to songs that are buried deep in yesteryear's music vault. I must admit that I also find it hard to believe that I can recall the lyrics to literally hundreds of songs that I remember from my youthful years. That is really the essence of our summer Kuser Park sing along program, "THE MUSIC WE GREW UP WITH," Jack gave me the article attached and as I read it, I realized that thus far, the Lord has allowed me to retain those lyrical music memories, In the attached photo, Ms. Nancy Briggs, one of my loyal concert followers, sings a duet with me as part of our sing-along custom.

Saturday, July 25, 2015

1805 AND 1806 TRENTON'S HISTORIC FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

 
 
In digging into the past history of the most famous Presbyterian church in the are, I came across a number of very interesting articles relating to the early years of the church and the search goes on. I found it particularly interesting as I dug way back to the years when the church was constructed in order to replace what was called the "Presbyterian Meeting House." Above are 3 very relevant articles that I have taken the time to embellish with appropriate tweaks in order to magnify the significance of these early 1800's news articles.

Friday, July 24, 2015

1933: THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ACT

1933: The year I was born. America was in the throes of what would become "The Great Depression." The economy was in the tank, unemployment and poverty was all around us. President Roosevelt signed the National Recovery Act which basically brought industry to a program of fair competition and price controls where possible. The photo above was on a huge R.C. Maxwell bill board that was once located on the north side of Perry Street at the intersection of North Warren Street. I have superimposed the very familiar "NRA" with the equally familiar "We Do Our Part" slogan emblazoned on the bottom of the ad. The ad was created in 1933, the year the NRA law was passed. You will see MANY very familiar Trenton commercial entities listed as committing to the NRA policies.

1932: DEDICATING THE TRENTON WHARF "PORT TRENTON"

Did you know that a deep Delaware stretched from Delaware Bay right up the Jersey-Pennsylvania sides of the Delaware up to South Trenton? Here's a fascinating set of graphics I put together telling just a small part of the story. Ships from all over the world came here and stories from some of my amateur radio contemporaries recall going aboard some of those ships as the DVRA (Delaware Valley Radio Association) members toured the various radio rooms aboard foreign vessels. Note also in the background, Lamberton Street homes are seen and in front of those homes, the old Farmers' Market stalls are seen. An interesting and informative peak at a time when America was in the depths of the Great Depression and Trenton was struggling with the rest of the nation.

Thursday, July 23, 2015

1933: EAST STATE & STOCKTON ST. - THE GREAT DEPRESSION

The city of Trenton is completely different from that of my young years. I would guess that the tallest buildings were the Broad Street Bank building and the Bell Telephone building. Today it is a completely different city. Indeed, a few years ago I went through the city when I was detoured from Hamilton Avenue en route to Sacred Heart church when I was a parishioner there. I had to detour to the freeway, exit at Perry Street, then to No. Warren and down toward the center of the city. WHAT A CHANGE! I realized how Rip Van Winkle must have felt after taking that long nap.
High rise glass encrusted building all over the place!
By the way: The Auburn Cord dealer was included at the bottom of the graphic; a special gift to our automotive historian.

1876: HAMILTON'S ST. MARY'S CEMETERY

 

The year 2016 will mark the 145th anniversary of St. Mary's Cemetery where many of our local citizens are resting until called by the Lord to be with Him. St. Mary's is a beautiful cemetery and a leisurely stroll along the pathways will reveal MANY familiar family name of those who have gone before us. 

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

1934: HUDSON AND ELMER STREETS, "THE BURG"

I posted this very detailed R.C. Maxwell Chambersburg view some time ago. I have re-formatted the original image in order to get a better close up view of the adjoining buildings as referred to by my friend and fellow classmate, Lee Belardino.  This post, like many of these R.C. Maxwell copyrighted photos, garnered a number of interesting comments. Below are the comments; and additional comments are welcomed.
:

Thanks to Tom Krawiec for correcting my former caption where I erroneously listed building being on the Corner of Division St. and Emory Avenue. Eagle eye Tom noted that the street sign clearly says Elmer. Your input is really appreciated, Tom. Thanks for the heads up on my error. Once again, thanks to Duke University Archives for this exquisite photo from R.C. Maxwell.

Anonymous Anonymous said...
http://mackstruckofwisdom.blogspot.com/2011/09/mazzillis-market-hudson-street-burg.html
Tuesday, December 13, 2011
Blogger Tom Glover said...
THANKS, ANONYMOUS. I COULDN'T FIND THE BUILDING ON HUDSON STREET, BUT IT HAS PROBABLY BEEN MODIFIED AS LISTED IN MACK'S POST OF MAZZILI PERSONNEL. THE BING BUILDING ON THE CORNER OF DIVISION SURE LOOKS LOOKED LIKE IT, BUT THANKS TO MACK, WE KNOW THEY WERE ON EMERY AND HUDSON WHERE THERE IS NO CONVENTIONAL CORNER.
TOM GLOVER
Tuesday, December 13, 2011
Lee Belardino said...
Tommy: Mazzilli and Battisti were located on the corner of Hudson and Elmer. Next door was Popkin's shoe store where I worked when I was 12 years old 3days a week after 6 and all day Saturday. Used to flirt with Battisti Mazzilli girls who sometimes gave me free Tasty cakes.

THANKS, LEE. It's nice to post photos that you all can relate to. Stay tuned....there will be more.
Tom
Tom Krawiec said...
The street sign over top of the store's front door say's "Elmer St"
Tom Glover said...
THANKS, TOM KRAWIEC:

I MADE A MISTAKE AND ENTERED EMORY. THANKS FOR THAT EAGLE EYE! I AM CHANGING IT.

TOM GLOVER

5 comments:

Anonymous said...
http://mackstruckofwisdom.blogspot.com/2011/09/mazzillis-market-hudson-street-burg.html
Tom Glover said...
THANKS, ANONYMOUS. I COULDN'T FIND THE BUILDING ON HUDSON STREET, BUT IT HAS PROBABLY BEEN MODIFIED. THE ONE ON THE CORNER OF DIVISION SURE LOOKS LIKE IT.
TOM GLOVER
Lee Belardino said...
Tommy,Mazzili and Battisti were located on the corner of Hudson and Elmer . Next door was Popkins shoe store where I worked when I was 12 years old 3days a week after 6 and all day Saturday. Used to flirt with Battisti Mazzili girls who sometimes gave me free Tasty cakes.
Tom Krawiec said...
The street sign over top of the store's front door say's "Elmer St"
Tom Glover said...
THANKS, TOM KRAWIEC:

I MADE A MISTAKE AND ENTERED EMORY. THANKS FOR THAT EAGLE EYE! I AM CHANGING IT.

TOM GLOVER